Thursday, February 26, 2015

Movie Cancelled Thursday February 26th

The Showing of "Queen Margot" will be re-scheduled for later in the semester.

Monday, February 23, 2015

HIST 127 Midterm Exam Study Guide

1. What were some of the conditions of the Catholic Church early in the 16th century that led to Luther’s Reformation and what were some of the major theological differences that Luther espoused? What were some of the reasons that Luther was able to succeed while others who had advocated reform before him failed?

2. What were some of the ways that the Catholic Church responded to the Reformation and why were they successful or unsuccessful?

3. The Thirty Years War was a conflict that had many participants over its long course. What were the specific events that sparked the conflict, how did the war progress? What were some of the long term consequences for The Holy Roman Empire and for Europe as a whole?

4. Describe some of the causes of the English Civil War. Why can we trace the roots of the conflict back to the reforms of Henry VIII? What are some of the legacies of the English Civil War both in political and social terms?

5. Louis XIV ushered in an age of increasing power for monarchs. Why were many individuals in France willing to tolerate an increase in central authority at this time? What were some ways in which he went about making this a reality?

6. During what we have described as the ‘scientific revolution’ a worldview that had been established in the Middle Ages was overthrown. What was the medieval view and what replaced it? How did the scientific revolution effect other developments, for example political or religious thought?

7. The economic system known as mercantilism was dominant in Europe before the rise of capitalism. What were some of the necessary factors that made a mercantilist economy work? What were some of the ways in which governments protected their mercantilist economies?

8. We have looked at the French Revolution in phases, moving from a ‘legal’ revolution to a ‘radical’ one. What were the main events in the legal revolution and how did the revolution become radicalized? What were some of the results of radicalization?

9. As historians, we face certain challenges when using different types of sources, such as law codes, fairy tales, or church records, such as inquisitional trial records. What are some of the different challenges we face with these different sources and what are some of the strategies we can use to utilize them in an effective manner? In your answer you should use specific examples from class.

Terms for identification:

immobile history
predestination
Fredrick the Wise
Peace of Westphallia
Marxism
Puritans
geocentric theory
Luddites
Tennis Court Oath
Sans-culottes
Agricultural revolution
Malthusian Theory
Heliocentric theory
Thomas Hobbes
Glorious Revolution
Plantation system
Huguenots
Peace of Westphalia
Augsburg Confession
Society of Jesus
Encomienda

HIST 125 Midterm Exam Study Guide

1. What are the major advances that developed during the Neolithic revolution? How did these advances pave the way for the development of more complex civilizations?

2. The development of Hebrew monotheism marked a drastic departure from the polytheistic belief systems of their neighbors. What are some of the outstanding features of Hebrew monotheism that marked it out from those other systems?

3. The political systems that developed in the Greek city-states of Athens and Sparta had certain limited similarities, but also many distinct differences. Describe both systems, explaining some of the reasons that they developed along different lines.

4. What are some of the reasons that Alexander of Macedon was able to conquer such a large empire in such a short period of time? Are there any similarities to the eventual fate of his empire and the conditions that allowed his initial rise to power?

5. Over the course of the three Punic Wars, Roman society was changed drastically. Describe the three wars, explaining the changes that occurred as a result of each for both Rome and Carthage.

6. What was ‘The Struggle of the Orders’? Describe the events that took place over the course of this struggle, the groups involved, and the outcomes, both for the groups involved, and for the outside development of Rome.

7. What was the Roman Revolution that took place from 133-127 B.C.E.? Who were the groups involved and what were the interests of each? Describe the important individual actors as well as the eventual outcome.

8. Describe the first few centuries of the development of Christianity. How was Christianity transformed from a Jewish cult into the official religion of the Roman empire? What were some of the earliest divisions in the new church? How did the early church deal with individuals who existed outside the normal ecclesiastical structure?

9. As historians, we face certain challenges when using different types of sources, such as law codes, myth, or sacred texts. We confront other types of challenges when using sources by ancient historians for whom we have some background information, such as Suetonius. What are some of the different challenges we face with these different sources and what are some of the strategies we can use to utilize them in an effective manner? In your answer you should use specific examples from class.

Identifications:

1. Cuneiform
2. Hittites
3. Zoroastrianism
4. Polis
5. Archaic Greece
6. Demokratia
7. Heroic Ideal
8. Homer
9. Seleucids
10. Stoics
11. Maccabees
12. Romulus
13. Gracchi
14. Cicero
15. Tiber
16. Corvus
17. Quintus Fabius Maximus
18. Spartacus
19. Servile Wars
20. Monumental Architecture

Monday, February 9, 2015

HIST 127 Reading Two Instructions

Reading Two Questions are due on Thursday February 26th/Friday February 27th.

In 'The Great Cat Massacre' read the introduction and the first chapter.


Define “History” and “Anthropology”.

What does Darnton mean when he talks about “cultural history” as opposed to some other type of history?

Why does Darnton believe that fairy tales are useful to us as historians?

How does Darnton use folklore as a historical source?

What does Darnton think of psychoanalyzing fairy tales?

What is l’histoire immobile? What is the context in which Darnton is using this phrase? How is it used as a support for the argument that we can use folklore to learn about history?

What are some of the specific concerns that Darnton sees as being addressed through folklore? Make sure to have some specific examples that he uses.

What process does Darnton use to learn history from the fairy tales he examines? Give some examples.

What does Darnton think about the differences between the French and German versions of some of the folklore examined?

Define and explain Darntons context for the following terms:
Neologism
Malthusian

HIST 125 Reading Two Questions

Reading two discussion questions are due Friday February 27th. In 'The Lives of the Twelve Caesars' read the introduction through page 248.

Who is Suetonius? Who did he work for and how long after the events he is describing did he live? How might these issues have colored his writings?

What was the purpose of the first Triumvirate, how did it come about?

How did Caesar gain the support of the people? Do you see examples of the factionalism mentioned in the lecture on Roman politics in this account?

Do you think Caesar would have claimed a crown? Does Suetonius think so?

Why is the second Triumvirate formed?

What is the relationship between Octavian and Marc Antony?

How did Augustus become emperor? What were his qualifications? Why did people accept him as emperor? Which groups of people did he have to win over?

According to Suetonius, what does an emperor do? How did Augustus spend his days?

How does Suetonius portray Augustus once he comes to power? Does he portray Julius and Augustus in different ways? Does he seem to like one more than the other?

Why is Augustus so concerned with the morals of the Romans? Is this concern confined to the aristocracy?

What is the arc of the career of Tiberius? Does Suetonius think Tiberius began as a good emperor?

How does Claudius become emperor? Did he want the job?

How does Suetonius present Claudius?

By the end of the reign of Nero, does it seem that Rome can continue as an empire?

Do you get the impression that Suetonius would prefer the Republic?

HIST 127 Paper One Instructions

Paper one is due on Friday February 27th.

Read the following selections from Jean Domat (1625-1696):

On Social Order and Absolute Monarchy.

http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/mod/1687domat.html

What imagery provides the basis for Domat's theorizing? How does Domat prove that government is necessary? Who does Domat mean by the `sovereign'? What is the basis of his/her power? Does Domat believe that absolute authority creates a ruler with no obligations or responsibilities?


1. Your paper should have a clear thesis, body, and conclusion.
2. Your paper should be between 3 and 5 pages in length.
3. See the syllabus for the grading scheme for papers
4. 12 point, Times New Roman font
5. double spaced
6. Cover page

For information on how to correctly use citations when writing history papers see:

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

Hist 125 Paper One Instructions

Paper one is due on Friday February 27th.

Read the following section from Thucydides.

http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/ancient/pericles-funeralspeech.asp

What is Pericles saying about the power of the state compared to the power of the individual. What does Pericles consider as priorities for the state? What would Pericles consider a good citizen, and how does this fit with what you know about Greek ideas about citizenship.

1. Your paper should have a clear thesis, body, and conclusion.
2. Your paper should be between 3 and 5 pages in length.
3. See the syllabus for the grading scheme for papers
4. 12 point, Times New Roman font
5. double spaced
6. Cover page

For information on how to correctly use citations when writing history papers see:

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

Monday, January 12, 2015

HIST 127 Map Quiz Study Guide

This is the study guide for map quiz three and map quiz four. The link below will take you to a practice map you can print out. The maps can be found in the textbook. There are also tons of maps on the web.

http://www.phschool.com/curriculum_support/map_bank/pdfs/w_europe_physicalA.pdf

1. Iceland
2. Atlantic Ocean
3. Rhine River
4. Danube River
5. Po River
6. Ebro River
7. Pyrenees Mts.
8. Alps Mts.
9. North Sea
10. Baltic Sea
11. Bay of Biscay
12. Straight of Gibraltar
13. Balearic Islands
14. Elbe River
15. Seine River
16. Loire River
17. Corsica
18. Sardinia
19. Sicily
20. Apennine Mts.

HIST 125 Map Quiz Study Guide

This is the study guide for map quiz three and map quiz four. The link below will take you to a practice map you can print out. The maps can be found in the textbook. There are also tons of maps on the web.

http://www.phschool.com/curriculum_support/map_bank/pdfs/w_europe_physicalA.pdf

1. Iceland
2. Atlantic Ocean
3. Rhine River
4. Danube River
5. Po River
6. Ebro River
7. Pyrenees Mts.
8. Alps Mts.
9. North Sea
10. Baltic Sea
11. Bay of Biscay
12. Straight of Gibraltar
13. Balearic Islands
14. Elbe River
15. Seine River
16. Loire River
17. Corsica
18. Sardinia
19. Sicily
20. Apennine Mts.



Spring 2015 Film Night List

Films will be shown on Thursdays at 5 p.m. in room 1-306 (The theater). You are required to attend one of the films that corresponds to your course. You will base your 3-5 page film analysis on whichever film you choose. You can come to any of the films, whether for your course or not, for extra credit points.


February 19th: Agora 125

February 26th: Queen Margot 127

March 5th: The Message: The Story of Islam 125

March 26th: Danton 127

April 2nd: Ironclad 125

April 9th: Beijing Bicycle (extra credit only)

April 16th: A Bridge Too Far 127

April 23rd: History Science Theater 3000: Brave Heart 125

April 30th: The Baader Meinhof Komplex 127

Saturday, January 5, 2008

Manifesto of the Communist Party: Full Text



http://www.marxists.org/archive/marx/works/1848/communist-manifesto/

Friday, January 4, 2008

Link to artwork by Hieronymus Bosch



http://www.google.com/images?hl=en&safe=off&q=hieronymus+bosch&um=1&ie=UTF-8&source=univ&ei=jArkTOv2KoGBlAfs_oWCDw&sa=X&oi=image_result_group&ct=title&resnum=3&ved=0CEoQsAQwAg&biw=1024&bih=605

Thursday, January 3, 2008

Selected Letters of Cicero



http://www.fordham.edu/HALSALL/ANCIENT/cicero-letters.html

Voltaire's letters on the English 1778



http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/mod/1778voltaire-lettres.html

Livy's History of Rome: Book 21 on Hanibal



http://mcadams.posc.mu.edu/tXt/ah/Livy/Livy21.html


Memoirs Of The Comtesse Du Barry, with minute details of her entire career as favorite of Louis XV. Written by herself



This is a link through the Gutenbug Project to the full text of this book.

http://ia300205.us.archive.org/0/items/7dbry10/7dbry10.txt

Wednesday, January 2, 2008

Important doccuments of the Reformation


http://www.iclnet.org/pub/resources/text/wittenberg/luther/web/ninetyfive.html



The Augsburg Confession
http://www.ctsfw.edu/etext/boc/ac/


Martin Luther: Against the Robbing and Murdering Hordes of Peasants
http://www.historyguide.org/earlymod/peasants1525.html

Martin Luther: On the Jews and their Lies (excerpts for class discussion)
http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/anti-semitism/Luther_on_Jews.html

Martin Luther: On the Jews and Their Lies (Full Text)
http://www.humanitas-international.org/showcase/chronography/documents/luther-jews.htm

Friday, December 28, 2007

Witchcraft Doccuments



Here are some selections from doccuments relating to witchcraft.

http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/source/witches1.html

Monday, August 27, 2007

The Malleus Maleficarum



http://www.malleusmaleficarum.org/

Thursday, August 23, 2007

revocation of the Edict of Nantes


King Louis the XIV revocted the edict in 1685, less than 100 years after his grandfather Henry IV had proclaimed it.



Robert Bellarmine: Letter on Galileo's Theories, 1615

Galileo's letter of 1614 to the Grand Duchess Christina Duchess of Tuscany was not widely known, and was ignored by Church authorities. When a year later the Carmelite provincial Paolo Foscarini supported Galileo publicly by attempting to prove that the new theory was not opposed to Scripture, Cardinal Robert Bellarmine, as "Master of Controversial Questions," responded.

Copernicus: The Revolutions of the Heavenly Bodies


Nicholas Copernicus was born February 19, 1473, in Poland. He entered the University of Krakow in 1491, then in 1495 went to Padua and studied medicine. In 1500 he was called to Rome and took the chair of mathematics there. He began to believe that the earth went round the sun about 1507 and from that time until his death worked, more or less intermittently, on his exposition of his theory. He delayed the publication of this exposition because of fear of being accused of heresy. Copernicus died May 24, 1543, just as his book was published. The knowledge of the time was not sufficient to prove his theory; his great argument for it was from its simplicity as compared to the epicycle hypothesis.


Monday, January 1, 2001

PRACTICE MAPS



This is a link to the blank maps that are used for the map quizes.

http://www.phschool.com/curriculum_support/map_bank/